Look up!

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My mum used to say “Look where you’re going or go where you’re looking!”

We tend to keep our eye on where we’re putting our feet because we don’t want to step in yuk, trip up, bump into something or somebody.  So we rarely scan skyward.

Waiting at the bus stop I admire the magnificent Blackpool Tower. It’s impressive. All five hundred and eighteen feet of it.  Wish I had a big fat lens.

What’s that bloke doing up there?

 

Back in St Annes walking past the Lifeboat Monument, for the second time in the day, I glance up and wish I had a big fat lens.

What’s that bird perched on the lifeboatman’s hat?

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Peregrine

Looking down rings the changes for the day

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Buckets

 

 

 

A grey day

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Today.  Rain.  Dark.  Grey.

Harbinger of autumn?

Winter around the corner?

The sun doesn’t need to shine for snapshot opportunities

Today’s all about straight lines

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New steps under St Annes Pier

People – now you see them …

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People

… now you don’t

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No people

 

St Annes Beach Huts

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St Annes Beach Huts

Starlings bathing in puddle in car park

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Starlings

Ullswater

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Shades of blue

Pooley Bridge, a bustling village at the northern end of Ullswater, is a good point to board one of the steamers, and a leisurely way to take in the magnificent Lakeland scenery. On Monday it was summer – perfect for a relaxing cruise with friends.

  • Ullswater is the second largest lake after Windermere
  • Wastwater is the deepest
  • Scafell Pike is the highest mountain in England

Whatever the statistics, there’s no getting away from the beauty of the Lake District:

  • the most visited national park in the United Kingdom
  • the largest of the thirteen national parks in England and Wales
  • the second largest in the UK after the Cairngorms

 

Generally, my preferred option of exploration is on foot. Ooh, the pain getting to the top. Aah, the relief when the ground levels out. Yum, the reward of a well-earned picnic. A good spot to settle down, take in the panorama of big skies, mountain peaks, wooded hillsides, inky blue lake dotted with miniature boats, is worth every breathless step of getting there.  That said, barely a ripple on the water, sunshine all the way, the effortless boat trip was a pleasure.

Cycling, sailing, walking, driving – the Lake District, which isn’t far from Blackpool, is special whichever way you choose to see it.

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Winding wall

Lytham Festival

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Lytham Festival

Poor Lytham Festival suffered a set-back on Sunday. Sadly the West End Musicals concert had to be abandoned because of gale force winds. It was more like November than August looking at the way people were dressed. Holding on tight to picnic tables, chairs, blankets, and sandwiches whilst trying to swig a glass of wine was more than a challenge.

 

 

Some just hunkered down waiting for the storm to pass.  It didn’t!

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I’m alright Jack!

 

Always in the hands of the weather living on the coast in North West Lancashire.

 

 

 

Big Butterfly Count on the Lancashire Coastal Path

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Knott End to Pilling is part of the Lancashire Coastal Path.  It’s an easy, flat walk and there’s no chance of getting lost en route. The River Lune is on your left going towards Pilling and on your right on the way back. Works for me!

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High tide and Lakeland mountains

The view of the Lake District in the distance is magical, so too Parlick and Wolf Fell in the Forest of Bowland.

Butterflies galore flitted and fluttered amongst the colourful wild flowers, whispy grasses, and fluffy seed heads that edged the footpath. This was the day to do the Big Butterfly Count.

I don’t really know a Painted Lady from a Tortoiseshell. The Large White, Small White and Green-Veined White are difficult to identify. They’re all white. The Common Blue and Holly Blue are, well … blue.  But the Big Butterfly Count Identification Chart is there to help – sort of. If only the little blighters would stay still for just one second, and leave their wings spread out rather than closed.  I don’t ever remember seeing so many butterflies in one day.

I crept up on a Peacock and a Holly Blue popped into shot!

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Peacock and Holly Blue

After a refreshing pint at the Golden Ball in Pilling, butterfly counting became compulsive on the return leg. I’m determined to learn to identify these fragile flutterers.

I’ve submitted my results and am hooked on counting for the rest of the month.

The Big Butterfly Count closes at the end of August.