Lytham Club Day – fun of the fair

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The lure of the fairground
Distorted music
Whirring, spinning,
death defying machinery
Ride attendants
urging everyone
to pay up and get on board
for a stomach churning experience

Funfair

Chaos

Funfair

Blood curdling screams

Happy families
with squealing,
bouncing kiddies,
little faces wrapped in candyfloss,
tongues chasing runny ice cream
as it dribbles down
its once crunchy cornet

Mmmm … the smells
Hot dogs and sizzling onions oozing tomato ketchup;
salt and vinegar chips;
sugary donuts for dunking
in gloopy chocolate sauce
Food of the gods? For some!

If you’re lucky
you might win a goldfish
or a cuddly toy
– at a price

Funfair

Hook a duck to win Henry

Funfair

Hello Spongebob!

Lytham Club Day Fun Fair,
back for another year

Funfair

Keep out or kept in?

 

 

 

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One man went to mow …

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… went to mow the meadow

Freckleton

Man at work

A quintessential summer’s day. Birdsong. Buzzards. Butterflies. A startled hare, disturbed by the thrum of the tractor, dashed across the field. That wonderful smell of freshly mown hay.

The farmer didn’t waste any time collecting the results of his labour.

Freckleton

Hay collected

Another meadow full of wild flowers ready for mowing.  A farmer’s work is never done.

Freckleton

Farmer’s next field for mowing

 

Freckleton

Speckled Wood

Freckleton

Large Skipper

Freckleton to the Naze is the start (or end) of the Lancashire Coastal Way.  It follows the creek leading to the River Ribble where the River Douglas joins.  A lovely spot for a picnic.

On the way back The Ship at Freckleton is perfect for a rewarding beer (and lunch if you’ve not already eaten a picnic) sitting in the garden overlooking the Lancashire plains with Winter Hill in the distance.  Note to self: picnic not required next time.

 

Avenham Park – Preston

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Drizzle didn’t spoil her
quiet contemplation
in the serene grounds
of Preston’s beautiful Avenham Park

Avenham Park

Quiet contemplation

Whatever the weather,
nothing stops
the urgency of collecting food
for a nestful of hungry chicks

Avenham Park

Female blackbird

Fragile daisies
growing out of the cracks in the wall
of the railway bridge

Wildflowers along the River Ribble

 

Always something uplifting
to see on one’s travels

Common Terns – Preston Marina

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They’re back!  About 130 pairs of common terns busy nesting on the floating pontoons at Preston Dock. What a racket as they jostle and squabble for a place in one of the purpose built next boxes, courtesy of Fylde Bird Club, Preston City Council and RSPB.  The nest boxes provide shelter for adults as they incubate their eggs and, once hatched, the chicks are contained and protected from marauding gulls on the look-out for a tasty snack.

Preston marina

Having a stretch

Preston marina

Rearranging nesting material

Preston marina

A silvery catch

Preston marina

Three eggs

It’s a wonderful sight and sound.  I’ll be back next week to see the hatchlings before they grow up.  They’ll take off in August, to return next April.

Two pairs bred in 2009.  Over 130 pairs in 2017.  That’s an amazing success story.

There are other inhabitants sharing Preston marina with the terns.

Preston marina

Hello!

 

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Rattus norvegicus

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Admiring the ducks and their ducklings I saw what I thought was unmentionable floating in the ornamental lake at St Annes.  Yuk!  But hang on, it was moving pretty swiftly for a number two.

Brown rat

Taking a swim

It’s the first brown rat I’ve seen taking a leisurely daytime swim.  He dived underwater, popped up, clambered onto the rocks, kindly posed for a pic, then off he swam!

Brown rat

Taking a breather

 

Brown rat

Back for another swim

These little guys get a lot of bad press, reviled for their association with disease.  In reality, they do their bit for mankind thriving on refuse and discarded food.  Living off the wastefulness of modern society.

Happy to have seen a Rattus norvegicus, couldn’t help but sing “Hanging Around” on the way home.  Now where is that Strangler’s album?

 

 

 

Grange over Sands – Hampsfell Hospice

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Hurrah! The rain stopped for a whole day, and the sun popped out once in a while, so it was a perfect(ish) opportunity to walk out of Grange over Sands up to Hampsfell Hospice.

Grange over Sands

Hampsfell – windswept tree looking over Morecambe Bay

The Hospice, a shelter for travellers, was built by the Vicar of nearby Cartmell.  It looks weird and out of place as it looms into sight on the gentle uphill hike across the fell.  Views from the top across Morecambe Bay, the majestic Lakeland Peaks, and Three Peaks range in Yorkshire are stunning.  And good old Blackpool Tower was visible in the distance!

Grange over Sands

The Hospice of Hampsfell

Grange over Sands

Scary steps up the Hospice

Grange over Sands

View from top of Hampsfell Hospice

The circular walk returned through woodland full of bird song – long tailed tits, nuthatches, great tits, blue tits, chaffinches and the usual suspects.  A clutch of treecreepers had flown the nest.  Anxious parents were exhausted trying to keep them in check.

A fabulous walk.  Another one to revisit on a hot summer’s day!

Grange over Sands – Humphrey Head

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Grange over Sands, the other side of Morecambe Bay to Blackpool, is barely an hour’s drive away.  It’s a neat little place with the prettiest ornamental gardens featuring a lake that’s home to a collection of exotic and local ducks and geese.  There’s an abundance of  hotels, guest houses, cafes, snack bars, independent clothes shops and gift stores.  Plenty to browse.

A leisurely walk down the mile and a half long promenade, edged with non-stop flower gardens, takes in awesome views across the bay where Arnside, Silverdale, the Bowland Fells, Heysham, and even Blackpool Tower can be seen.  It has to be bright and sunny though!  Two out of three of the days of my stay at Grange were wet and grey.  But there’s no such thing as bad weather.  It’s all down to bad clothing.  Tell that to my walking boots!

Trench foot aside, a walk from Grange to Humphrey Head in low cloud and drizzle was really lovely.  Most of the Morecambe Bay coast is low-lying.  The cliffs at Humphrey Head rise to 172 ft.  Even on a grey, drizzly day, the view over the wide expanse of sands towards the Lancashire coast to the south is breathtaking.  Must pay another visit on a clear and/or sunny day!

Grange over Sands

Descent from Humphrey Head to Humphrey Point

Inquisitive sheep exploring the sands couldn’t get any further, so scampered back to the salt marsh where they do what sheep do – graze and sleep!

 

Grange over Sands

From Humphrey Head